Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby Hockey Ref » Sun May 24, 2009 10:01 pm

I did some hiking this past weekend in the San Francisco region and really missed having my poles on the steep uphill and downhill segments. They make a world of difference and are not what I would consider a hassle at all.
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby Tiz » Wed Jul 27, 2011 3:25 pm

If you use them as a tent pole for your UL tent, they are not a hassle but a necessity ;)
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby llholmes1948 » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:04 pm

I will revive this old discussion (Wonderful to see the Hockey Ref's post again) and post a link to this recent article in the Missoulian (originally from the Spokesman-Review) which some Chatters may find helpful:

http://missoulian.com/lifestyles/recrea ... 9c6a8.html
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby calicotraveler » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:09 pm

I always use them while trekking. Great help and I feel something is missing if I try to hike without them.
The mountains are calling and I must go.
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby Goat » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:58 am

I use one pole when backpacking, but mainly because it's also my tent pole (MLD duomid). I tried 2 poles once, and didn't like that at all; 2 poles really slowed me down, especially on the downhills. I also think that training with a pole noticeably decreases my speed, agility & balance, so I tend to do my dayhikes/training hikes without a pole. A pole does come in handy for things like crossing streams, digging catholes, and so forth.

My two cents anyway.

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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby brindledog » Sun Jun 25, 2017 3:25 pm

100% worth the hassle.

I never used them until I hiked while pregnant (needed them for balance), then carrying kids on my back. At first, my motivation was burning more calories from pregnancy. Well, also to keep my balance going on steep trails with rocks.

My kids no longer ride on my back, but I would not hike even a short, flat hike without them.
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby PeteE » Sun Jun 25, 2017 7:30 pm

Yes, hiking sticks help me a lot, especially going downhill.
I sure wish I had both of mine with me today instead of just one.
I always take one thank God!
The Mt. Brown lookout trail is the toughest hike I've done in a long time.
In hind sight A "Two Stick" trail for sure. imo.
You'll see why when I post a few pics and video later tonight---if I can stay conscious 8)

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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby PeteE » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:27 am

Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Well....
I think this video from my Reynolds Mt climb July 2017 is good example of why trekking poles might be a good idea. 8)
The clip is also a very good reminder of why they put those "loop things" on the handles. :arrow:

The video is the beginning of the traverse around the south face of Reynolds Mt after the Great Cleft traverse of the North face(faces Visitor Center).
Begins where the photo below was taken, and is arguably the scariest part of the Grand Tour route--at least for me.
Very steep, long drop to your left. The trail is narrow and somewhat sloped with loose stuff on hard rock underneath.
And the whole mountain is that "crappy rock" that GNP is known for.

Runs about 6:52 (The impatient should skip to about 3:00)
https://youtu.be/xK_Vek2MAQA

pete :wink:

PS
Many Thanks again to EarMountain
An Awesome day Ralph :D

The "spur ridge" below runs out to the south, then turns east.
You can see just a bit of Mt Jackson in the far upper right with Fussilade in front of it with the Twin Lakes far below.
Part of the Jackson-Blackfoot Glacier complex is seen to the left of Fussilade.
During the Reynolds fire, I hiked out that spur ridge to where the short cliff/ledges begin. Took my sticks that day too
8)
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby Sue Z » Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:23 am

Jeepers! Nice relaxing video to watch over my morning coffee! Feels like I drank 3 cups instead of one. Just wondering: Did you take the same route on the descent?

I rely heavily on two poles - for stability, for boosting myself up and for letting myself down easy. One quirky exception: When on a narrow ledge or super steep sidehill, I only plant the outside (downhill) pole. It feels like if I use the inside pole, I might push myself off the mountain!

Silly observation: Those snow fields in your photo remind me of Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm-Flailing Tubeman. http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-a-wack ... 17026.html
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby PeteE » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:10 pm

Sue Z wrote:Jeepers! Nice relaxing video to watch over my morning coffee! Feels like I drank 3 cups instead of one. Just wondering: Did you take the same route on the descent?

Hi Sue :) Yeah, a bit of a rush for me too! LOL
We didn't go back that way. The "Grand Tour" is one of 4 routes listed in most books.
Grand Tour in that it's the only one that "circumnavigates" the entire mountain.


I rely heavily on two poles - for stability, for boosting myself up and for letting myself down easy. One quirky exception: When on a narrow ledge or super steep sidehill, I only plant the outside (downhill) pole. It feels like if I use the inside pole, I might push myself off the mountain!

Depending on the hike, I usually just use one pole because I like to have a hand free for my camera.
Stash the second pole in my pack just in case I need it.
Yeah, you have to watch against "pushing off" like that. You might push yourself all the way off :(

I dropped my inside stick because I like using my "inside hand" for hand holds when it gets really narrow.
Sometimes, putting a stick away is just too awkward/time consuming.
Most of the time I can just let go of the stick while I get hand holds. NOT ALWAYS though.
My rule is:there is no rule. Do what is necessary or required for safety.
That day I just "instinctively" let go of my stick to get a hand hold on that rock outcrop and OOOPS, didn't have my hand through the loop. :evil:
Bad mistake.

Ralph did remind me about another mistake that newbies like me tend to make---
"leaning into the mountain"
Sometimes on a narrow dicey trail, you might find yourself "leaning into the mountain" when you have a steep drop off---similar to the situation in the video.
Leaning puts your center of mass away from where it should be---over your hips, legs, and feet.
That imbalance, especially on a scree covered path that slopes toward the abyss, may cause your feet to go right out from under you towards the drop off.
:(



Silly observation: Those snow fields in your photo remind me of Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm-Flailing Tubeman. http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-a-wack ... 17026.html

Hehehehe. I look like "Tubeman" on a dance floor :arrow:



pete :wink:


Alls well that ends well. We got to the top :mrgreen:
Awesome views in every direction. Looking west here, the Dragon's Tail is below me to my right. Edwards and Mt Brown in the distance.
The closer water is the head of Hidden Lake. Lake McDonald in the distance


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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby Ear Mountain » Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:09 am

PeteE wrote:Awesome views in every direction. Looking west here, the Dragon's Tail is below me to my right. Edwards and Mt Brown in the distance.
The closer water is the head of Hidden Lake. Lake McDonald in the distance


Image

And don't forget the nifty little peak known as the Little Matterhorn. It's in between Edwards and Brown.
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby PeteE » Fri Mar 16, 2018 6:00 pm

Trying to forget yesterday's BC campsite fiasco.... 8)
I thought I'd revive the topic of "trekking poles" with a request for information on the trekking pole pictured below.
"Boss Lady" frequents the Goodwill Store and found this trekking pole and thought I'd like to have it.
Can anyone make out, what is presumably the name of the maker, the word above "MADE IN GERMANY"?
I like the stick and intend on using it after treating the leather. It's dried out and the strap is cracking.
Perfect length as it happens too--about 127cm :)


Thanks

pete :wink:

PS

For those who care about such things :)
It does have what appears to be a carbide tip embedded in the stainless steel business end.
However, it's well worn, and so it probably won't "hurt" the rocks too awfully bad.
8)
Yeeeeeehawwwwww!!
:arrow: :arrow: :arrow: :arrow: :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:

Is that the name of the maker?
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The lacing is clearly hand sewn
Image


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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby orin » Fri Mar 16, 2018 7:43 pm

I can't read it either. Be careful to keep it away from the critters. My poles are made of nylon, foam, plastic and aluminum and have been well chewed by deer and marmots. They would go crazy with a delicacy like real leather.
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby TnTammy » Sat Mar 17, 2018 7:23 am

orin wrote:I can't read it either. Be careful to keep it away from the critters. My poles are made of nylon, foam, plastic and aluminum and have been well chewed by deer and marmots. They would go crazy with a delicacy like real leather.


As Orin says, best to guard that nice pole from critters...and I would add especially up at Grinnell Glacier Overlook, right Pete?! :lol: Crafty quick ones, those Marmots!
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Re: Trekking poles---worth the hassle?

Postby PeteE » Sat Mar 17, 2018 9:26 am

orin wrote:I can't read it either. Be careful to keep it away from the critters. My poles are made of nylon, foam, plastic and aluminum and have been well chewed by deer and marmots. They would go crazy with a delicacy like real leather.


Hey Orin :)
Yeah, I have a habit of leaving my sticks lay around for marmots, goats, and squirrels, or dropping one off some mountainside, or leaving them by a stream out near UPK, or in ND's(Ken's) van.
You really don't want to know what I've spent on hiking sticks.
And so as of last weekend I'm down to these two "mismatched" sticks--a blue Leki and a purple Black Diamond
8)

Image





TnTammy wrote:As Orin says, best to guard that nice pole from critters...and I would add especially up at Grinnell Glacier Overlook, right Pete?! :lol: Crafty quick ones, those Marmots!


OH MY!
LOLOLOLOL :mrgreen:

Circa July 2012
You mean that marmot?
8)
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And my sticks there above Michael ?
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Good thing that, once again, I had great hiking partners looking out for me! :arrow:
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Thanks Tammy and Mike. :D
Image

You guys have a good time this year in the Sawtooths!
I'll be up at Grinnell overlook again in September. I have 3 nights at Granite Park Chalet. Gonna try to get to Grinnell Mt peak and Iceberg Notch.


Cheers!

pete :wink:

PS

You and Mike remember this monster mule deer? For those who don't know...
This was July 27th. This mule deer buck had another month to grow his antlers!!
I would have loved to have seen him in September. 8)

unedited 25 seconds
https://youtu.be/R2r5-eTLQwA
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