Howe Ridge Fire

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llholmes1948
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Howe Ridge Fire

Post by llholmes1948 »

Link to an interesting article on the Howe Ridge Fire in the Hungry Horse News. I wonder how the fire has affected the trails in that area and what condition those trails are in now. I don't think we have had any recent trip reports from anyone who has hiked in that area.

https://hungryhorsenews.com/news/2020/j ... mation-10/

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tibber
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Re: Howe Ridge Fire

Post by tibber »

Meanwhile, mature trees that had managed to survive previous burns also survived Howe Ridge, particularly mature larch, whose thick bark makes them fire adapted and fire resistant.

On the north side of the fire in particular, this has resulted in a meadowy forest, with about a 50 to 75 percent survival rate among mature trees.

Below them bloom stands of wildflowers and grasses. In addition, just from my own observation, it appears that serviceberry, a food source for numerous bird and mammal species, has rebounded quite nicely.

Some bushes which obviously burned over are already three feet high — not bad considering it’s only been two growing seasons since the fire.

Still, longterm questions arise from the Howe Ridge blaze. Will the hemlock forest that was regenerating after the Robert Fire ever return along the sores of Lake McDonald? Will the thinning of lodgepole on the northern front come back once again in “doghair” fashion, or will it be a thinned forest with many small meadows?
He makes it sound not as bad even though we all know... and yes, it will come back but not in my lifetime that's for sure.

Two things of note is who doesn't love a "meadowy" forest :D . Second, what is "doghair" fashion? Never heard the term before. I did find this but don't know that I fully comprehend it ( I just don't get the doghair visual): Lodgepole pine can occur as the only tree in dense, very slow-growing groups of trees (so-called "dog-hair" stands).

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Re: Howe Ridge Fire

Post by PeteE »

llholmes1948 wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 8:01 am
Link to an interesting article on the Howe Ridge Fire in the Hungry Horse News. I wonder how the fire has affected the trails in that area and what condition those trails are in now. I don't think we have had any recent trip reports from anyone who has hiked in that area.

https://hungryhorsenews.com/news/2020/j ... mation-10/
I saw in a recent Summit Post report that the trail from Lake McDonald up Howe Ridge and over to the lakes is easy to follow.
The people summited Stanton.
They also said the bushwhack to the ridge wasn't too bad.

"Dog-Hair" is an old expression for trees growing REALLY close together.
I remember hearing it growing up in Florida about new stands of slash pine.
Out here it's usually lodgepole pine. And the density of new lodgepole pine forests are incredible.
Some stands are growing so close together only the smallest animals can get through the trees.

pete :wink:
"When you're born in this world, you're given a ticket to the freak show.
And when you're born in America, you're given a front row seat."

George Carlin

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